Rutgers University Library Dissertations On Bullying

Description

TitleRelationships among work engagement, drivers of engagement, and bullying acts in registered nurses working in hospital settings

NameFountain, Donna Marie (author); Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte (chair); Cadmus, Edna (internal member); Cannella, Barbara (internal member); Hutchinson, Marie (outside member); Rutgers University; Graduate School - Newark

Date Created2016

Other Date2016-01 (degree)

SubjectNursing, Work environment, Bullying in the workplace, Hospitals--Employees, Nurses

Extent1 online resource (viii, 118 p. : ill.)

DescriptionThis study aims to analyze the interrelationships of work engagement, drivers of engagement (psychological meaningfulness, psychological safety, and psychological availability), and bullying acts (personal attacks, attacks on competence and reputation, and attacks on work roles and tasks) among registered nurses (RNs) in hospital settings. No studies have been found regarding these complex psychological factors that influence nurses’ engagement within U.S. hospitals. Because an engaged nursing workforce is key to optimal clinical, employee, and organizational outcomes across healthcare systems, it is vital that hospital and nursing leadership address problems arising from drivers of engagement, and bullying. Method. Rutgers Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval was granted. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES- 9), Psychological Conditions Scale (PCS), and Workplace Bullying Inventory (WBI) were used to explore the interrelationships between work engagement, drivers of engagement and bullying acts. A descriptive, correlational survey was conducted among a sample of 210 participants recruited from a randomly selected list of 500 RNs working in hospitals. Results. The psychological drivers of engagement increased RN work engagement. Supervisory role, working more hours per week, in an acute care hospital, and working on specialty care units were related to higher levels of RN work engagement. Lower levels of engagement were associated with staff nurses, working on medical-surgical units, and those working in a specialty hospital. Bullying acts were related to lower levels of drivers of engagement and work engagement. Lastly, drivers of engagement and hours worked above fulltime, medical-surgical units, and hospital type were shown to be independent predictors of RN work engagement. Conclusion. Drivers of engagement and bullying acts were significantly related to work engagement. These findings suggest that psychological drivers of engagement are important predictors of work engagement and bullying had a negative effect on this outcome. Nursing administrators should determine strategies to strengthen workplace conditions that foster the psychological drivers of RN engagement. This study contributes strong evidence that more research is needed.

NotePh.D.

NoteIncludes bibliographical references

Noteby Donna Marie Fountain

Genretheses

Persistent URLhttps://doi.org/doi:10.7282/T3NZ89PC

Languageeng

CollectionGraduate School - Newark Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Organization NameRutgers, The State University of New Jersey

RightsThe author owns the copyright to this work.

Description

TitleA street-level perspective

NameKugelman, Kristen G. (author); Lugg, Catherine A. (chair); Giarelli, James (internal member); Bulkley, Katrina (outside member); Rutgers University; Graduate School of Education

Date Created2015

Other Date2015-05 (degree)

SubjectEducation, Culture and Society, Middle school teachers--New Jersey, Bullying, Bullying in schools--Law and legislation--United States

Extent1 online resource (viii, 261 p.)

DescriptionBullying behavior has significant academic and emotional implications (Swearer, Espelage, Vaillancourt & Hymel, 2010; New Jersey Office of the Child Advocate, 2009). Using a phenomenological case study approach, this dissertation sought to understand how educators, as street-level bureaucrats, made sense of New Jersey’s Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights (ABR, 2010) given the human, social and material resources at their disposal. The lived experiences of educators in two public middle schools were illuminated. Findings suggested that the resources available at the local level impact the quality of the organizational sense making process. Therefore, context does matter. It was evident that educators, as street-level bureaucrats, have access to a significant source of power within their local community. With respect to the ABR, this power was either frustrated by fear of legal consequences or it flourished as educators acted as civic entrepreneurs (Durose, 2011). The significance of this study was that it highlighted the way that power, located within local school districts, might be harnessed to support the implementation of research-based policy initiatives. A quality sense making experience is critical. While the findings from this study are not generalizable, they may be transferable and suggest additional studies (Marshall & Rossman, 2010).

NoteEd.D.

NoteIncludes bibliographical references

Noteby Kristen G. Kugelman

Genretheses

Persistent URLhttps://doi.org/doi:10.7282/T37D2WZG

Languageeng

CollectionGraduate School of Education Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Organization NameRutgers, The State University of New Jersey

RightsThe author owns the copyright to this work.

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