Strong Analytical Essay Example

Somehow in the high school, your teacher stated something like an analytical essay, defined it as a type of writing that tries to analyze a text in an already established topic. This sounds like a perfect simplified mode of writing that just summarizes the events or characters but in practice, it can prove to be hectic. So, before learning how to write a good analytical essay, need have to have a clear understanding of what it actually is.

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Introduction

By definition, it’s an academic writing that separates the ideas and facts, gives the meaning to the facts to enable the reader to understand them easily. From this definition, it is very clear that it is not just a summary of the text, but an arrangement of how themes and characters align in a narrative. Analytical essay assists the reader to have a larger scope of understanding than it would be provided in a summary, as the facts are scrutinized and examined closely to portray the actual meaning of the text in a broader clearer picture.

How to write a good analytical essay

Writing a successful paper is not as automatic as you might think, thus, it requires some critical considerations. Remember that every word appealing and also helpful to the reader. The first genuine step is by studying examples of analytical essays considered successful.

This step sets a clear understanding of how to arrange the ideas and facts, and how to present them in the analysis. Of course, you are not confined to write exactly the way other samples outline, but it a great way to kick start your learning process.

Once an idea has been incepted in your memory, scrutinize the topics to have a clear understanding of the facts at hand.

Proper formatting

There are several writing outlines but generally, three general parts namely the Introduction, the Body and the Conclusion incorporated in every essay. The three make the general format of an essay.

The introduction

Plays an integral part of the overall writing. The first sentence should be interesting and attractive to the reader so that it can instill a motivation to continue studying the analysis. There are several options available to kick start your creative writing like making a compromising statement, giving interesting breathtaking facts or even asking a rhetorical question. This style draws the inspiration and the reader cannot wait to see the content in the whole review. After this, create a proper thesis statement that now introduces the reader to the main subject as it is.

The last bit is the proof of how you the thesis statement are supported throughout your analysis. It is from the introduction where you develop a list of ideas and topics to be included in the body.

The body

- is the PowerPoint of the entire writing so creativity should be portrayed at its best here. Typically, the body should not have less than three paragraphs depending on the topic under scrutiny but a writer can incorporate as many as deemed fit with his work.

The structure of the body mainly involves a topic sentence, a claim and the evidence. This is the general template of an analytical essay. The topic sentence introduces the reader on what the paragraph entails. The claim narrows down on more specific details concerning the topic sentence. And finally, the evidence section supports the claim. The three should allow the reader to understand the topic under consideration leaving no loopholes along. The evidence should directly relate to the claim to give a good flow of ideas in the topic.

Conclusion

It is a summary of your essay stating your main points indirectly.

This is the finishing point of any paper. This section should be literary good to prompt the reader to go over the topic again and again to probably get some facts right about a misunderstood section. It’s a point of reference and review. The reader can use it as a guide to refer back to the topics discussed. It is better if the conclusion can leave the reader satisfied and contented with the facts and evidences outlined on the essay.

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It is important

From the above points, analytical essay writing follows the outlined general structure. It is the effort of the writer to make it as persuasive as possible so as to accomplish the intended purpose in its meaning. It is important to review the whole work after done writing to see and improve on the ideas outlined in the whole statement.

The following is a sample of the kind of analytical essay you are being asked to write.

Although this essay ends up agreeing with the authors, one could have a well-argued paper that disagrees with them.  In that case, one might want to spend more time developing the objection, so as to ensure that one is still being charitable.

DO NOT:

  • Do not treat this as a cookie-cutter.  That is, do not try to copy the exact form of this sample, paragraph-for-paragraph.  The number of paragraphs that are necessary for summarizing the argument, or providing a criticism, or responding to that criticism (if appropriate) will vary from case to case.
DO:
  • Instead, you can use this as a sample of the style of paper you are being asked to write.  For example, once you have figured out what the key premises of the author’s argument are, you can communicate them discursively as I have done in this sample essay.
  • Note the use of topic sentences in the paragraphs.  This helps to focus the principle point of the paragraph.  Note that the conclusion is essentially a re-statement of the thesis, which is acceptable for a philosophy paper.


Having trouble cutting your paper to within 750 words (give or take)?  Click to see the original version of this paper which was about 150 words over limit.  It shows where I cut, so you can have an idea of how to cut down your paper.


Student Name (Student Number)
Tutorial: D1.XX (Day, Time)
Tutorial Leader: TA’s name

Word Count: 754 (comes out to just under 3 pages, double-spaced)
 

Just Confessions

  Saul Kassin and Gisli Gudjonsson, in their article for Scientific American Mind, “True Crimes, False Confessions,” argue that “society should discuss the urgent need to reform practices that contribute to false confessions and to require mandatory videotaping of all interviews and interrogations” (2005, p. 26).  After analyzing their argument, I shall argue that, although one might object that Kassin and Gudjonsson focus too heavily on the importance of protecting criminal suspects, they provide a compelling argument that social justice requires such reforms as mandatory video-tapping of police interrogations.
In developing their case for the need to reform interrogation tactics, Kassin and Gudjonsson survey a number of studies regarding the role of confessions in criminal investigations.  For example, they are at pains to provide evidence that interrogations are often influenced by a bias on the part of the interrogator.  Further concern is found in the fact that Miranda rights, as found in the American legal system, are insufficient safeguards, given that suspects, especially innocent ones, often waive those rights.  Finally, Kassin and Gudjonsson note that aggressive interrogation tactics can often produce false confessions.
    What makes these findings most troubling, according to Kassin and Gudjonsson, is the strong correlation between false confession and wrongful conviction.  Trial jurors, we are told, are inclined to give disproportionate weight to a confessions, even taking it to outweigh so-called “hard evidence.”  As a characteristic example, Kassin and Gudjonsson cite the case of Bruce Godschalk.  Even when DNA evidence proved Godschalk could not have been the rapist, the District Attorney of the case refused to release him from prison, stating that “…I trust my detective and his tape-recorded evidence” (Kassin and Gudjonsson, 2005, p. 28).  Because of this tendency on the part of jurors and prosecutors, together with the facts listed above regarding the potential for unrestricted interrogations to elicit false confessions,  Kassin and Gudjonsson argue for the need to reform police interrogation tactics.
    Underlying their argument is the implicit moral principle that social justice requires that we do everything we can to minimize the potential to wrongly convict innocent persons.  This may seem obvious, but one could reasonably question whether it puts too much emphasis on protecting potentially innocent suspects and not enough on convicting potentially guilty criminals.  In a perfectly just system, criminals would always be brought to justice and treated appropriately, and innocent suspects would always be exonerate.  However, any system devised and implemented by humans must deal with the reality of imperfection.
    The difficult moral question we need to ask is how we are to balance the needs of society to protect itself from criminals while at the same time protecting the rights of innocent persons.  We need to ask at what cost we are willing to limit the ability of police and Crown prosecutors to prosecute criminal suspects.   Imagine, for example, the following two systems: (1) Almost no innocent persons are ever convicted, but a very high percentage of recidivist offenders are able to escape conviction, (2) A very high percentage of offenders are caught and brought to justice; however, a small but non-negligible percentage (say 3%) of innocent persons are unjustly caught in the system and thus wrongly punished for crimes they never committed.  Neither of these is very palatable, but if forced to choose, my intuitions favor result (2).  Of course, there are many variables at work here, and I do not have the space to delve into a detailed discussion of all the relevant trade-offs.  My basic point is that social justice requires not only that we protect innocent individuals from prosecution, but that we hold guilty persons accountable for their actions.
    While I think that this is a reasonable worry to raise given the tenor of Kassin and Gudjonsson’s article, I do not think it ultimately undermines their argument.  That is, I think one might reasonably object that they are overly focused on the possibility of false confessions without saying much about the utility of true confessions.  However, their specific proposal that interrogations be video-taped does not seem to diminish the ability of police to effectively interrogate suspects and, when possible, to elicit a confession.  Indeed, they conclude their essay by citing a study showing that police largely found the practice of video-taping to be quite useful and not to inhibit criminal investigations.
So, even if one thinks that Kassin and Gudjonsson are a bit one-side in focusing on false confessions, ultimately I think these authors provide a compelling argument for the need for such reforms as mandatory video-taping of police interrogations.
 

References

Kassin, Saul and Gudjonsson, Gisli (2005). “True Crimes, False Confessions,” Scientific American Mind, July, pp. 24-31.
 
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